Inspiration

Creativity + Imagination + Smarts

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When most ad agencies launch something product-like, they have no plan in place on how to maintain it. They treat the launch of a product the same way they treat the launch of a new campaign and therefore have no teams set up to maintain it afterwards. And as soon as they get their press and maybe some awards, an ad agency will lose interest in the product and move on to the next thing. Also, as most of these products are paid for by marketing dollars, the budget is only to make it, not to continuously maintain it. When an agency loses the funding for a project, they will lose interest as well. To seriously create a product, the budget has to be planned years out, not just until launch.
Leif AbrahamSPIKE AND DIE: WHY PRODUCTS CREATED BY AD AGENCIES FAIL, Fastcocreate.

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A country music feminist anthem - ‘The girl in a country song’ by Maddie and Tae

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In his book, The Tipping Point, author Malcolm Gladwell makes the same mistake with regard to social epidemics—viral cascades of ideas that are elusively transferred from one person to another.

He calls this his “Law of the Few” and it is very convincing. We all know people who seem to have rare social gifts, such as those with lots of friends or the gift of gab, and it makes sense that that such “influentials” would play an important role in the spread of ideas. Unfortunately, influentials are a myth.

The truth is that social influence is quite complex and defies simple explanations. The science of networks does offer a very effective framework for understanding social epidemics, but it is highly mathematical and somewhat counterintuitive, so most people are perfectly happy to chase the influential myth even though it’s all for naught.

Don’t Chase Unicorns

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Yet when business analysts look at data, they too often mistake correlation for causality. Just as it’s easy to assume that all billionaires in California made their money in high tech and all Russians are corrupt, they disregard the data that they can’t see. So, just like primitive tribes, they create myths based on incomplete data.

Don’t Chase Unicorns

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To create a winning strategy, you must figure out how to create value in a way that is distinct from your competitors. There are only two kinds of competitive advantage: to operate with sustainably lower costs or to differentiate by offering a significantly better product or service. You can choose a low-cost strategy, like Walmart or Southwest Airlines does, where you profit by creating a lower cost structure than rival companies. Or your company might go with a differentiation strategy, like Whole Foods or P&G, and charge a price premium for your products or services, because they’re more valuable to customers. Whichever you decide on, be sure to clearly choose one. No company can win by attempting do both.
Playing to Win” (via peterspear)

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The Economics Of Sex

Marriage rates have hit an all time low.

The annual revenue of the dating industry is at an all time high - $1bn+

This video explores how this entire situation came to be…the contraceptive pill and it’s unintentional (but massive) impact on modern relationships.

If sex no longer leads to babies, that means marriage is optional, resulting in a significant gender split in the supply and demand of the ‘mating market’.

More men are looking for casual sex - they can be picky and insist on extensive sexual experience before committing (i.e. maximising rewards whilst investing fewer resources). 

Women are are looking for commitment - they are time sensitive and therefore the solidarity women once felts towards each other in the ‘mating market’ has dissolved, leading to high competition and lowered values.

In summary, the market value of sex has declined and right now, there’s not much we can do about it.

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The life of a typical American

The average American man lives to about 76, and the average woman until 81. In that lifespan, the average person will spend more than five decades going to school and working — with just two to three decades left over for being a toddler and retiree.
Here’s how all of that looks in one chart put together by Wait But Why 

The life of a typical American

The average American man lives to about 76, and the average woman until 81. In that lifespan, the average person will spend more than five decades going to school and working — with just two to three decades left over for being a toddler and retiree.

Here’s how all of that looks in one chart put together by Wait But Why