Inspiration

Creativity + Imagination + Smarts

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Offensive Veet Ad Shows Exactly Why Shaming Women Won’t Make Them Buy Your Products

Hair removal company Veet has attained a trifecta of offensiveness with their new ad campaign “Don’t Risk Dudeness,” which manages to be sexist, homophobic and transphobic in 30 seconds flat.

The spot opens with a man lying in bed, reaching out to caress what he thinks will be his girlfriend’s baby-smooth leg. Alas, she has literally transformed into a big, hairy dude overnight because she went one day (one day!) without shaving. Hate it when that happens.

Said dude, who is dressed in a pink tank top and still has a girl’s voice (because men displaying any femininity is hilarious), says sheepishly, “Yeah, I know, I’m a little prickly. I shaved yesterday!” The ad then closes with the tagline, “Don’t risk dudeness! Veet Wax Strips: Feel womanly around the clock.” 

Nothing like a little body shaming to make a gal never want to buy a Veet product again.

Marketers regularly pray on women’s insecurity to sell them beauty products, but this is ridiculous. For one thing, showing two men in a bed together for laughs is a tired, homophobic joke. Even worse, equating body hair with “dudeness” (plus poking fun at a guy in a cami) is more than a little transphobic. Last time I checked, waxing doesn’t make you a girl, and going natural doesn’t make you a guy. In the words of India Arie, we are not our hair.

Besides, if a guy ever were to shame a woman he’s in bed with for having stubble (something I highly doubt happens all that often anyways), he doesn’t deserve an apology. He deserves to get kicked out of bed.

Via PolicyMIC

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This cover of Nirvana’s ‘Heart Shaped Box’ with live-looping is absolutely beautiful.

Last week, Esquire featured a killer cover of Nirvana’s “Heart Shaped Box” by an artist named Kawehi. The music video featured the singer performing a live-looped, synth-heavy version of the song that will turn your world upside-down. Spin picked it up, and a bunch of blogs followed. Even Courtney Love approves

More detail here

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How to turn a hate into love? Honey Maid and Droga5 turned the heated debate into an art project. #nicetwist

(Source: hallojo)

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The illusion of choice.
These 10 corporations control almost everything you buy.
Ever wonder why you can’t get a Coke at Taco Bell? It’s because Yum! Brands was created as a spin-off of Pepsi—and has a lifetime contract with the soda-maker.
Unilever produces everything from Dove soap to Klondike bars. Nestle has a big stake in L’Oreal, which features everything from cosmetics to Diesel designer jeans.
Despite a wide array of brands to choose from, it all comes back to the big guys. 

The illusion of choice.

These 10 corporations control almost everything you buy.

Ever wonder why you can’t get a Coke at Taco Bell? It’s because Yum! Brands was created as a spin-off of Pepsi—and has a lifetime contract with the soda-maker.

Unilever produces everything from Dove soap to Klondike bars. Nestle has a big stake in L’Oreal, which features everything from cosmetics to Diesel designer jeans.

Despite a wide array of brands to choose from, it all comes back to the big guys. 




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5 Insights From Social Entrepreneurs On How Business Can Lift People Out Of Poverty
How do you profitably sell to a customer who earns less than $2 per day?
It is probably the most daunting business question in the world. As well as the most important, because that’s the earning power of nearly one third of humanity, the 2 billion people at the so-called “base of the pyramid.”
The challenge is immense. The typical base-of-pyramid customer lives in a remote rural village, in a cramped hut with no clean running water, electricity, or indoor toilet. The household is typically illiterate, unreachable by traditional marketing channels, has no savings or access to affordable credit, and is dangerously vulnerable at any moment to disease, injury, or natural disaster.
And yet a new kind of entrepreneur is springing up who sees things differently, for whom business is the best way to fight poverty.
These social entrepreneurs view their customers—the world’s poorest people—as collectively comprising the world’s largest under-served market, with an annual purchasing power of over $1 trillion. For them, creating businesses to serve this market is both a massive opportunity as well as a moral duty.

Here are some of the strategies they’re using to change the world:

1. Recruit and empower local changemakers
2. Build a movement, not just a market
3. Embrace competition
4. Motivate with mission, not money
5. Maximise distribution, not profits
 

5 Insights From Social Entrepreneurs On How Business Can Lift People Out Of Poverty

How do you profitably sell to a customer who earns less than $2 per day?

It is probably the most daunting business question in the world. As well as the most important, because that’s the earning power of nearly one third of humanity, the 2 billion people at the so-called “base of the pyramid.”

The challenge is immense. The typical base-of-pyramid customer lives in a remote rural village, in a cramped hut with no clean running water, electricity, or indoor toilet. The household is typically illiterate, unreachable by traditional marketing channels, has no savings or access to affordable credit, and is dangerously vulnerable at any moment to disease, injury, or natural disaster.

And yet a new kind of entrepreneur is springing up who sees things differently, for whom business is the best way to fight poverty.

These social entrepreneurs view their customers—the world’s poorest people—as collectively comprising the world’s largest under-served market, with an annual purchasing power of over $1 trillion. For them, creating businesses to serve this market is both a massive opportunity as well as a moral duty.

Here are some of the strategies they’re using to change the world:

1. Recruit and empower local changemakers

2. Build a movement, not just a market

3. Embrace competition

4. Motivate with mission, not money

5. Maximise distribution, not profits