Inspiration

Creativity + Imagination + Smarts

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Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.
A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way. 

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.
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Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.

A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way

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The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.

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(via fastcodesign)

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A traditional TV planner is hopelessly ill-prepared for this world because they are trained to look for the static concept. Media planners won’t be able to do it either because they are trained to think about maximising the number of interactions but not creating the quality or the content of those interactions. User Experience Architects — or Experience Planners, as they will become – are trained to think about ordering and organising smaller experiences (a click, a reaction, a discovery, a decision) into a coherent, overall journey that results in a positive experience.
Nick Hirst. Dare. “Why experience architecture is the future of planning" warc sub req’d (via peterspear)

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If nothing else, perhaps soon we won’t need to call people ‘consumers’ or any other label that seems to degrade the value they can provide to an ecosystem of new choices and new ways of doing business.
Gunther Sonnenfeld, Consumer Activism In The Social Era

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We discovered that crop yields, and thus profits, are maximized if considerable acreages of cropland are left uncultivated to support wild pollinators.


A variety of wild plants means a healthier, more diverse bee population, which will then move to the planted fields next door in larger and more active numbers. Indeed, farmers who planted their entire field would earn about $27,000 in profit per farm, whereas those who left a third unplanted for bees to nest and forage in would earn $65,000 on a farm of similar size.

Our Bees, Ourselves, NYTimes

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Advertising as a profession is over 200 years old. In reality, it’s less art and science than it is factory farm. Even in the face of clients taking more work in-house, consumers connecting directly with brands to shape their products and their promotions, and the decentralization of mass communication, the industry is largely focused on fine tuning yesterday’s business model at the cost of inventing tomorrow’s. Moreover, ad schools across the country still churn out cookie-cutter graduates formed to fill roles we should have left behind more than a decade ago.
How to disrupt yourself: The high cost and benefits of hiring misfits, Bud Caddell

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Re-imagining work - a talk by Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Office at Microsoft.

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Awesome magical selfies

So here’s something awesome: 26-year-old Helene Meldahl is bringing Martha Stewart-level crafts straight to a smartphone near you. Though we’re all well-acquainted with the sometimes-diabolical selfie, Meldahl’s personal pics depict a magical universe rarely seen in a sea of Instagram faces. This lady doodles elaborate background set-pieces in the mirror before she snaps a shot.

Meldahl told MyModernNet that her selfies can take up to thirty minutes to concoct, and her favorite materials to use are “either chalk or acrylic markers.” Of her method, she says, “for me it kind of comes natural to draw.” 

You can find more of the mastermind’s masterpieces @mirrorsme, where a year’s worth of the Norwegian photographer’s imaginative doodles come to life. No filter needed.

Via HelloGiggles

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Boy Uses Lemonade Stand Profits To Donate 330 Wheelchairs To Developing Countries

A child normally starts a lemonade stand for the sole purpose of selling lemonade, and maybe uses the extra change to buy a new video game or something.

Zack Francom, 11, did something a bit different with his lemonade stand. Over the course of 4 years, he raised enough money to buy 332 wheelchairs for people in developing countries.

“Zack’s Shack,” as he calls it, runs over one weekend once a year in Provo, Utah. The stand sells cookies for $1 and lemonade for $.50 per cup. The money raised goes to LDS Philanthropies, the charitable aspect of the Mormon church.

The organization donates wheelchairs to over 55 developing countries where a wheelchair could cost over a year’s salary.

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My observation is that the biological clock and the career clock are in total conflict with each other. Total, complete conflict. When you have to have kids you have to build your career. Just as you’re rising to middle management your kids need you because they’re teenagers, they need you for the teenage years.

And that’s the time your husband becomes a teenager too, so he needs you. What do you do? And as you grow even more, your parents need you because they’re ageing. So we’re screwed. We cannot have it all.

PepsiCo CEO, Indra K. Nooyi - on why women can’t have it all.