Inspiration

Creativity + Imagination + Smarts

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Supervenus by 

"Supervenus" is a short film by animator Frederic Doazan that manages to capture all the horror and grotesque idolatry wrapped up in Western beauty standards… in just under two and a half minutes.

"Western society imposes standards of beauty inconsistent with physical and psychological health," reads the YouTube description of the video. "Disorders such as anorexia and addiction to cosmetic surgery and body dysmorphic disorder in both men and women are encouraged. It is imposing an image of physical care seeking eternal youth."

The full length film is due to hit the internet in a few months time.

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The PayPal Mafia - some of Silicon Valleys biggest and brightest stars.

Among students of business, PayPal may be known less for its own success than for the subsequent achievements of the people who built it. Those individuals, now known as the PayPal mafia, went on to launch a raft of companies that have become household names, including at least seven now valued at more than $1 billion: Tesla  TSLA 0.14%  and SpaceX (co-founded by Elon Musk), LinkedIn  LNKD -0.93%  (Reid Hoffman), YouTube (Steve Chen, Chad Hurley, and Jawed Karim), Yelp  YELP -0.69%  (Jeremy Stoppelman and Russel Simmons), Yammer (David O. Sacks), and the data-mining company Palantir (co-founded by Thiel in 2004).

The PayPal Mafia - some of Silicon Valleys biggest and brightest stars.

Among students of business, PayPal may be known less for its own success than for the subsequent achievements of the people who built it. Those individuals, now known as the PayPal mafia, went on to launch a raft of companies that have become household names, including at least seven now valued at more than $1 billion: Tesla  TSLA 0.14%  and SpaceX (co-founded by Elon Musk), LinkedIn  LNKD -0.93%  (Reid Hoffman), YouTube (Steve Chen, Chad Hurley, and Jawed Karim), Yelp  YELP -0.69%  (Jeremy Stoppelman and Russel Simmons), Yammer (David O. Sacks), and the data-mining company Palantir (co-founded by Thiel in 2004).

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WATCH THE “100 MOST ICONIC SHOTS” IN MOVIE HISTORY

It’s impossible to quantify iconicity. Nobody can really say one way or another what makes one image more iconic than the next. Fortunately, this supercut of the 100 Most Iconic Shots of All Time does away with ranking and just presents one incredible, familiar visual after another.

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Because when it comes to guys, we have whole fandoms bending over backwards to write soulful meta humanising male characters whose actions, regardless of their motives, are far less complex than monstrous. We take male villains and redeem them a hundred, a thousand times over – men who are murderers, stalkers, abusers, kinslayers, traitors, attempted or successful rapists; men with personal histories so bloody and tortured, it’s like looking at a battlefield. In doing this, we exhibit enormous compassion for and understanding of the nuances of human behaviour – sympathy for circumstance, for context, for motive and character and passion and rage, the heartache and, to steal a phrase, the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to; and as such, regardless of how I might feel about the practice as applied in specific instances, in general, it’s a praiseworthy endeavour. It helps us to see human beings, not as wholly black and white, but as flawed and complicated creatures, and we need to do that, because it’s what we are.

But when it comes to women, a single selfish or not-nice act – a stolen kiss, a lie, a brushoff – is somehow enough to see them condemned as whores and bitches forever. We readily excuse our favourite male characters of murder, but if a woman politely turns down a date with someone she has no interest in, she’s a timewasting user bimbo and god, what does he even see in her? Don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen some great online meta about, for instance, the soulfulness and moral ambiguity of Black Widow, but I’ve also seen a metric fucktonne more about what that particular jaw-spasm means in that one GIF of Cumberbatch/Ackles/Hiddleston/Smith alone, and that’s before you get into the pages-long pieces about why Rumplestiltskin or Hook or Spike or Bucky Barnes or whoever is really just a tortured woobie who needs a hug. Hell, I’m guilty of writing some of that stuff myself, because see above: plus, it’s meaty and fun and exactly the kind of analysis I like to write.

And yet, we tend overwhelmingly not to write it about ladies. It’s not just our cultural obsession with pushing increasingly specific variants of the Madonna/Whore complex onto women, such that audiences are disinclined to extend to female characters the same moral/emotional licenses they extend to men; it’s also a failure to create narratives where the women aren’t just flawed, but where the audience is still encouraged to like them when they are.

Gender, Orphan Black and the Meta of Meta (via adaslist)